Posted on

what do seeds eat

Healthy Seeds And How To Eat Them

There’s no doubt that you should add seeds and kernels to your diet. Here’s why and what foods to add them to

Pictured, left to right: Chia seeds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, hemp seeds, linseeds (also known as flaxseeds)

Seeds contain all the nutrients and power to produce plants hundreds of times their size, and so it makes perfect sense to hijack that potential yourself by adding some to your diet.

Seeds are rich in unsaturated fats and much-needed vitamins and minerals. The question is really not whether you should get a little seedy, it’s which seeds you should go for – and the tastiest way to add them into your life.

Chia Seeds

The constant need to label anything and everything a superfood might have led to chia seeds’ benefits being overstated, but they are undoubtedly a nutritional powerhouse. A couple of tablespoons provide 10g of fibre – a third of your daily target – as well as plenty of healthy unsaturated fats and protein.

How to use them: Chia seeds are pretty much tasteless, so you can sprinkle them liberally over anything from baked goods to smoothies.

Pumpkin Seeds

A great source of a wide variety of vitamins and minerals, pumpkin seeds also contain plenty of protein and a boatload of unsaturated fats. Really quite a lot of fat, in truth, so be careful not to end up pumpkin-shaped yourself.

How to use them: Perhaps the most delicious of all the seeds, roast them up and add to porridge or a stir-fry, or sprinkle them with salt and gorge on the seeds by themselves. Although clearly this is the less-healthy option.

Sunflower Seeds

If it’s vitamin E you’re after, and any fans of healthy skin and eyes will be, sunflower seeds are your best bet in the world of kernels. A couple of tablespoons will net you over half your recommended daily intake of vitamin E, as well as a decent whack of protein and healthy fats.

How to use them: Like pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds are a tasty snack by themselves, even if you don’t salt them. They also spruce up a fruit-and-yoghurt breakfast.

Hemp Seeds

The protein kings of the seed world, a couple of heaped tablespoons will net you 10g of the stuff, and like many of its seedy brethren, hemp is also chock-full of unsaturated fats.

How to use them: Hemp seeds can be added to bread and salads, but the truly adventurous might also fancy making their own hemp milk by blending the seeds with water.

Linseeds (also known as Flaxseeds)

A similar nutritional profile to chia seeds, providing a bounty of healthy fats, protein and fibre, but without as much hype, so linseeds are generally a bit cheaper.

How to use them: Linseeds have a nutty flavour and are an excellent addition to salads or porridge, or even a homemade coleslaw.

There’s no doubt that you should add seeds and kernels to your diet. Here’s why and what foods to add them to

Watermelon, Pepita, and 6 More Seeds Your Gut Will Love

Seeds may be the tiniest superfoods on the planet. They can be sprinkled, crushed, or pureed into tasty spreads to deliver tons of health benefits.

“Seeds… are little bundles of energy, protein and nutrients,” says Debbie Petitpain, MS, RDN, registered dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Most are excellent sources of fiber, something Americans get way too little of.”

Registered dietitian Kristen Smith, MS, RDN, LD, concurs: “Seeds are an easy way to include a heart-healthy, plant-based protein source in your diet.”

“Their unsaturated fats are health-promoting and essential — plus, seeds add interest to any meal with their earthy flavors and crunchy textures,” says Petitpain.

In a nutshell (no pun intended), these tiny goodies are packed with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, healthy fats, and tons of flavor.

We’re sold. Here are 8 seeds to start incorporating into your diet, plus ideas for how you can add them to your daily eats and treats.

“Chia is high in fiber (almost 10 grams per ounce), which can promote regularity (aka avoid constipation) and lower cholesterol,” says Petitpain. “Chia’s also a great plant source of the omega-3 essential fatty acids and the mineral calcium.”

Make sure to drink plenty of water with chia since the seeds absorb liquid and may increase constipation if you’re even just mildly dehydrated.

How to add them:

Whisk ¼ cup of chia seeds into 1 cup of nondairy milk and flavor it with vanilla extract, maple syrup, or jam. Let it sit overnight to thicken, and then enjoy a calcium-rich, plant-based breakfast pudding.

“Pepitas offer a protein-rich addition to a snack or meal, with more than 8 grams of protein per ounce. Pepitas are also a wonderful source of heart-healthy fats, magnesium, and phosphorus,” says Smith.

How to add them:

Pepitas are a delicious topping for soups and salads. “Many people also enjoy roasting pepitas as a snack option,” says Smith.

Seeds may be the tiniest superfoods on the planet: little bundles of energy and protein — plus fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, healthy fats, and tons of flavor. Here are 8 seeds to start incorporating into your diet, plus ideas for how to add them to your daily eats and treats.