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Hemp Seeds Hulled Organic

€ 2,30 – € 23,00 incl. BTW

These hearty nutty seeds are great on salads or can be incorporated into baked good recipes, such as muffins or cakes.

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Description

Organic hulled hemp seeds are a delicious, nutritious and versatile food. Originating in Central Asia, hemp cultivation became popular in Europe during the Middle Ages. In the 1500s, it was planted in Chile, and a century later, in North America. Considered to be one of the most nutritious plants in the world, hemp can be cultivated to make a wide variety of products. These products include superfoods, fabrics, natural remedies and more.

The edible seeds of the hemp plant can be shelled or unshelled. Shelled hemp seeds, often referred to as hemp hearts, are a health food that can be consumed raw. They contain all of the essential amino acids and are an ideal source of protein for vegans and raw foodies. They also have a rich nutritional profile and provide a range of great health benefits. Hemp seeds abound not only in protein, but in fibre and fatty acids. They contain omega-3s and omega-6s and have antioxidant properties.

How to Use
Hemp seeds can be eaten raw, ground to make hemp meal or sprouted. Similar to chia seeds, they can be added to smoothies, cereals, salads and yogurt. They can also be incorporated into baked good recipes, such as muffins or cakes. Hemp seeds are often used in raw recipes, or cooked at low temperatures. Cooking at low temperature will preserve its rich omega oils. Hemp seeds are a great addition to cereals, porridges and superfood ‘wake-up’ bowls. Alternatively, hemp seeds can be used to create creamy salad dressings or blended into hemp seed milk.

Production Process
Hemp seeds are harvested with a combine tractor, dried and cleaned to remove stocks, leaves and immature seeds. They are then passed through a hulling machine which removes a layer of shell skin protecting the seed. At the end of the process, only the insides of the seeds remain. They are cleaned and kept cool in grain bins until they are shipped.

Storage
Store in a cool, dry place, and keep out of direct sunlight.

Shelf Life
Ask in-store. See the bag.

Ingredients
Organic hulled hemp seeds

Allergens
No known allergens present

Country of Origin
Origin China. Processed in the EU.

Nutritional Information

    • Energy 2562 Kj
    • Calories 610 Kcal
    • Fat 52 g
      • Of which Saturated 4 g
    • Carbohydrates 1 g
      • Of which Sugars 1 g
    • Fibre 2 g
    • Protein 32 g

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Our organic hulled hemp seeds are a delicious and nutritious food that has often appreciated for its astonishing versatility.

Everything You Need to Know About How to Eat Hemp Seeds

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Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods

As far as the nut and seed world goes, hemp seeds are like the straight-A student who’s also captain of the football team. A couple of spoonfuls of hemp seeds packs a serious amount of essential nutrients, they’re easy to eat and cook with, and they have a pleasantly nutty taste, like a cross between a sunflower seed and a pine nut. And no, they won’t get you remotely high. Here’s everything you need to know about how to buy and eat these little seeds.

Although hemp and marijuana are members of the same species, Cannabis sativa, they’re in effect completely different plants. There are about a dozen varieties of hemp plants that are grown for food, and all of them contain about 0.001 percent Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. This means you can eat as much hemp as you want and you’ll never have to worry about getting high or failing a drug test. Although certain states have begun to legalize the cultivation of industrial hemp in the last couple of years, the hemp seeds you can find at your grocery or health food store were likely grown in Canada or China.

Hemp plants grow brown popcorn kernel-sized hard seeds. Inside these hard seeds lie soft, white or light green inner kernels that are packed with essential amino acids, protein, and omega-3 fatty acids. You can’t really derive a lot of nutritional value from the unhulled seeds, so when you see a bag at the store labeled “hemp seeds,” what you’re actually buying is those soft inner kernels, also known as hemp hearts. Hemp hearts can be pressed to make hemp seed oil, leaving behind a byproduct that can be turned into hemp protein powder. You can find all of these hemp products at health food stores, or a well-stocked grocery store like Whole Foods.

Eating shelled hemp seeds, or hemp hearts, is as simple as sprinkling a spoonful or two into smoothies or on top of cereal, salads, or yogurt, says Kelly Saunderson of Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods, the world’s largest hemp foods manufacturer. People with gluten sensitivity can use hemp seeds as a substitute for breadcrumbs to coat chicken or fish. Just like you can blend almonds and water to make almond milk, you can do the same with hemp seeds for hemp seed milk, which you can use as an alternative to dairy milk in drinks and recipes. And because of its nutty flavor, hemp seeds make a great substitute for people with nut allergies—you can dry-toast them over low heat to bring out even more of that nuttiness.

Hemp seed oil should be used as a finishing oil, rather than a cooking or frying oil, since the delicate omega fatty acids will break down during the cooking process, stripping the oil of its nutritional benefits. Instead, use it to make salad dressings, or drizzle over pasta, grilled veggies, or popcorn.

Hemp seeds are considered one of the most valuable plant-based proteins out there. Here's what you need to know about how to eat them.