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How to Start Morning Glory Seeds Indoors

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Morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea) produces deep-purple flowers that open during the early part of the day. When grown on trellises or fences, the vine can reach 6- to 10-feet tall and provide a living privacy screen. Morning glory is an annual plant that can readily reseed itself; so it often returns each year on its own. Starting morning glory seeds indoors about six weeks before you plan to transplant the resulting seedlings into the garden, however, ensures you’ll have enough plants in the desired locations.

Prepare the seeds

The Missouri Botanical Garden recommends nicking the seed coat of each morning glory seed with a razor blade or knife so the lighter, inner seed coat is visible. Soak the seeds overnight in a bowl of warm tap water. Nicking the seed coat and soaking the seeds will increase your odds of successfully germinating morning glory seeds.

Get the pots ready

Fill 2-inch diameter seedling pots with potting soil to prepare for growing morning glories indoors. Place the pots on a drip tray. Water each pot’s soil until water drips from the pot’s bottom. Allow the pots to drain for one hour. Empty the water that collected in the drip tray.

Sow the seeds

When growing morning glory in pots, sow one morning glory seed 1/2 inch deep in each pot. Cover each pot with clear plastic. The plastic helps to retain soil moisture and heat, creating a mini greenhouse above each pot.

Germinating morning glory seeds

Set the pots in a brightly lit location out of direct sun that is 65 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit. Morning glory germination time is usually within seven to 14 days after the seeds are planted. Remove the plastic from the tops of the pots when seedlings emerge from the soil to prevent the pots from becoming too hot.

Care for seedlings

Provide the seedlings with six to eight hours of daily sunlight, and maintain temperatures between 65 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit in their location. Water the seedlings when their soil’s surface begins to dry. Although morning glories are not picky growers, according to Florida Gardening, they do appreciate being pampered.

Transplant seedlings outside

Transplant the morning glory seedlings from their pots when they are about four weeks old and the outdoor garden soil’s temperature is above 65 degrees Fahrenheit. The garden must have well-drained soil and receive full sun exposure. Plant the seedlings at the same soil depth at which they grew in their pots, and space the plants 15 to 18 inches apart.

How to Start Morning Glory Seeds Indoors. Morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea) produces deep-purple flowers that open during the day. When grown on trellises or fences, the vine can reach 6- to 10-feet tall and provide a living privacy screen. Morning glory is an annual plant that can readily reseed itself; so it often …

Growing Morning Glories: How To Grow Morning Glory Flowers

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Morning glory flowers (Ipomoea purpurea or Convolvulus purpureus) are a common sight in many landscapes and may be found in any number of species within the Calystegia, Convolvulus, Ipomoea, Merremia, and Rivea genera. While some varieties are described as noxious weeds in some areas, the fast-growing vining plants can also make lovely additions to the garden if kept in check.

All morning glory plants produce attractive funnel-shaped blossoms of various shades like white, red, blue, purple, and yellow with heart-shaped leaves. Blooming usually occurs anywhere from May through September, opening in the morning and closing in the afternoon. Most types are annual, though in some warmer regions they will come back yearly or may re-seed themselves in almost any zone they grow in.

How to Grow Morning Glory Flowers

Growing morning glories is easy. They’re great for containers when provided with a trellis or placed in a hanging basket.

Morning glories prefer full sun but will tolerate very light shade.

The plants are also well known for their tolerance to poor, dry soils. In fact, the plant can easily establish itself in any slightly disturbed area, including garden edges, fence rows, and roadsides where the vine is commonly seen growing. Even with the plant’s tolerance of poor soil, it actually prefers well-draining soil that is moist, but not soggy.

When to Plant Morning Glories

Morning glory plants are easily started by seeds sown directly in the garden after the threat of frost has passed and the soil has warmed up. Indoors, the seeds should be started about four to six weeks before the last frost in your area.

Since morning glories have relatively hard seed coats, you should soak the seeds in water overnight or nick them before sowing. Sow the seeds of morning glory about ½ inch (1 cm.) deep and give them about 8 to 12 inch (15-31 cm.) spacing.

Once plants have reached about 6 inches (15 cm.) or so in height, you may want to provide some type of support for the vine to twine around. Those planted in hanging baskets can simply be left to spill over the container’s edge.

Care of Morning Glory Plants

The care of morning glory plants is also easy. In fact, once established they require little attention.

Ideally, the soil should be moist, but not wet. Water them during dry periods, once or twice per week. Container plants may require additional watering, especially in warmer regions.

To reduce re-seeding and control unwanted spreading, simply remove spent blooms as they fade or all the dead vines after the first killing frost in fall.

Morning glory flowers are a common sight in many landscapes. While some varieties are described as weeds, they can also make lovely additions to the garden if kept in check. Click here for more information.