CBD Oil With Turmeric Side Effects

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Both CBD and turmeric are thought to have great benefits for inflammation and ridding the body of toxins. But how does it work? Find out more about complementary medicines and the top five that people contact us about. Products containing cannabidiol (CBD) are very popular, promising relief from a wide range of maladies. But if you are considering taking a product containing CBD, be aware that if you are taking any other prescription or over-the-counter medications, supplements, or herbal products, CBD can interact with them and cause unexpected …

Whats the deal with….CBD and turmeric?

If CBD and turmeric offer potential benefits for inflammation, could it make sense to combine both?

15th August 2021

Both CBD and turmeric are thought to have great benefits for inflammation and ridding the body of toxins. They are now being combined as food, capsules, oil and coffees. But how does it work?

Turmeric

Turmeric is the spice that gives curries a vibrant yellow colour. It comes from the root of a plant called Curcuma longa. For centuries the compound curcumin contained in turmeric has been used in Indian medicine as an anti-oxidant. It also may have potential anti-inflammatory properties. This makes it perfect for helping to boost the similar properties that are associated with CBD.

There have been a few recent reviews and trials on turmeric for knee pain and arthritis.

A review from this year on turmeric for anti-inflammatory has revealed it may help with osteoarthritis (OA). The researchers concluded that over the ten studies examined when compared with a placebo, there appears to be a benefit of turmeric on knee OA pain and function.

In a small study from 2020 on 70 patients diagnosed with knee arthritis, it was discovered that those taking turmeric reported less knee pain.

CBD has also shown potential for soothing arthritic pain. In one study, researchers treated arthritic rats with a topical form of CBD. The rats showed a difference in inflammation levels and their condition was less developed.

It is unknown how CBD and turmeric combine. As they have main similar properties, it could be beneficial to combine both for certain conditions such as osteoarthritis.

Absorption issues

One difficulty with taking turmeric is that it is incredibly hard to absorb due to its hydrophobic nature. This causes the molecules to stick together when they come into contact with water in the body. It is thought that adding pepper to turmeric will increase the absorption rate by 2000 percent.

Both CBD and turmeric have low bioavailability making it difficult to absorb them easily. However, they are both lipophilic which means adding fat can help them absorb better.

How to take CBD and turmeric

This is why CBD and turmeric as supplements come with an oil base. Different companies use different bases including rapeseed, hemp or flaxseed oil. Taking these compounds suspended in an oil automatically makes them more easily absorbed. The oil can be popped under the tongue for a few minutes before being swallowed.

Food and drink

Taking CBD and turmeric in food may be less effective than oil. Turmeric is often added to coffee as a latte which CBD can be dropped into. The lower level of fat in the drink, or in certain foods can make it unreliable for absorption but very tasty. Another problem is that the food has to travel through the digestive system first before any of the CBD or turmeric can be absorbed. Digestive acids and enzymes destroy some of the CBD before it can be absorbed. The small amount that gets through the intestinal wall will then be metabolised by the liver before it reaches the rest of the body.

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Capsules

Unfortunately, capsules are also subject to being passed through the digestive system. This could give a slower effect in comparison to the oil which is absorbed through the oral mucous membranes much faster.

Complementary treatments and arthritis – from turmeric to cannabis oil

People use complementary medicine for many different reasons, including:

  • wanting to use more natural treatments
  • their symptoms aren’t fully controlled by conventional medicine.

Read more about complementary therapies which can help to ease the symptoms of arthritis, from yoga to meditation.

Are they right for me?

As with all complementary treatments, different things work for different people and it isn’t possible to predict which might be the most useful or effective.

There are some key points to consider if you’re thinking about using any complementary treatments.

  • What are you hoping to achieve? Pain relief? More energy? Better sleep? Reduction in medication?
  • What are the financial costs?
  • Is there any evidence for their effectiveness?

Are complementary medicines safe?

Complementary medicines are relatively safe, although you should always talk to your doctor before you start any new treatment.

In specific cases they may not be recommended, for example, if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, or they may interact with certain medication.

A starter for five

Here we share a spotlight on the most popular complementary medicines that people call our helpline about.

Turmeric

It’s thought that turmeric can possibly reduce inflammation, which could help people with arthritis.

People with knee osteoarthritis who took part in a research trial reported improvements to their pain levels after taking turmeric. The evidence is limited however, as it is from just one trial. What evidence there is suggested that people only had minor side-effects after taking turmeric.

Turmeric can be bought from health food shops, pharmacies and supermarkets in the form of powder.

Glucosamine

Glucosamine sulphate and glucosamine hydrochloride are nutritional supplements. Animal studies have found that glucosamine can both delay the breakdown of and repair damaged cartilage.

The results for the use of glucosamine for osteoarthritis are mixed and the size of the effect is modest. There’s some evidence that more recent trials and those using higher-quality methods are less likely to show a benefit.

Capsaicin

Capsaicin is taken from chilli peppers. It works mainly by reducing Substance P, a pain transmitter in your nerves. Results from randomised controlled trials assessing its role in treating osteoarthritis suggest that it can be effective in reducing pain and tenderness in affected joints, and it has no major safety problems. Evidence for its effectiveness for fibromyalgia is related to a single trial.

Other names: Axsain®, Zacin®, chilli, pepper gel, cayenne

Capsaicin is licensed in the UK for osteoarthritis and you can get it on prescription in the form of gels, creams and plasters.

There are no major safety concerns in applying capsaicin gel/cream. A review of capsaicin applied to the skin to treat chronic pain (not specifically related to osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or fibromyalgia) concluded that around one third of people experience a reaction around the area where the treatment is applied. It’s important to keep capsaicin away from your eyes, mouth and open wounds because it will cause irritation. There have been no reported drug interactions.

Fish oils

Fish oils are rich in omega-3 essential fatty acids, which have strong anti-inflammatory properties. Fish liver oil is also a rich source of vitamin A (a strong antioxidant) and vitamin D (which is important for maintaining healthy joints).

Evidence suggests that fish body oil can improve the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Unconfirmed evidence also suggests a combination of fish body and liver oils might also be useful in the long term, particularly in reducing the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). There isn’t enough evidence for the use of fish liver oil for osteoarthritis.

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Omega-3 fatty acids also play a role in lowering cholesterol and triglyceride levels in your blood, so they can reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke in people with inflammatory arthritis.

In the UK, dietary guidelines recommend eating two portions of fish a week, including one oily. Fish oil is considered to be well tolerated at this dose.

At the correct doses, side-effects are usually minor and uncommon.

Cannabis oil (CBD)

CBD is type of cannabinoid – a natural substance extracted from the cannabis plant and often mixed with an oil (such as coconut or hemp) to create CBD oil. It does not contain the psychoactive compound called tetrahydrocannabidiol (THC) which is associated with the feeling of being ‘high’.

Research in cannabinoids over the years suggests that they can be effective in treating certain types of chronic pain such as pain from nerve injury, but there is currently not enough evidence to support using cannabinoids in reducing musculoskeletal pain. We welcome further research to better understand its impact and are intently following developments internationally.

CBD oil can be legally bought as a food supplement in the UK from heath food shops and some pharmacies. However, CBD products are not licensed as a medicine for use in arthritis by MHRA (Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Authority) or approved by NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) or the SMC (Scottish Medicines consortium).

We know anecdotally from some people with arthritis, that CBD has reduced their symptoms. If you’re considering using CBD to manage the pain of your arthritis, it’s important to remember it cannot replace your current medicines, and it may interact with them, so please do not stop/start taking anything without speaking to a healthcare professional.

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CBD and other medications: Proceed with caution

Products containing cannabidiol (CBD) seem to be all the rage these days, promising relief from a wide range of maladies, from insomnia and hot flashes to chronic pain and seizures. Some of these claims have merit to them, while some of them are just hype. But it won’t hurt to try, right? Well, not so fast. CBD is a biologically active compound, and as such, it may also have unintended consequences. These include known side effects of CBD, but also unintended interactions with supplements, herbal products, and over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications.

Doubling up on side effects

While generally considered safe, CBD may cause drowsiness, lightheadedness, nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, and, in rare instances, damage to the liver. Taking CBD with other medications that have similar side effects may increase the risk of unwanted symptoms or toxicity. In other words, taking CBD at the same time with OTC or prescription medications and substances that cause sleepiness, such as opioids, benzodiazepines (such as Xanax or Ativan), antipsychotics, antidepressants, antihistamines (such as Benadryl), or alcohol may lead to increased sleepiness, fatigue, and possibly accidental falls and accidents when driving. Increased sedation and tiredness may also happen when using certain herbal supplements, such as kava, melatonin, and St. John’s wort. Taking CBD with stimulants (such as Adderall) may lead to decreased appetite, while taking it with the diabetes drug metformin or certain heartburn drugs (such as Prilosec) may increase the risk of diarrhea.

CBD can alter the effects of other drugs

Many drugs are broken down by enzymes in the liver, and CBD may compete for or interfere with these enzymes, leading to too much or not enough of the drug in the body, called altered concentration. The altered concentration, in turn, may lead to the medication not working, or an increased risk of side effects. Such drug interactions are usually hard to predict but can cause unpleasant and sometimes serious problems.

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Researchers from Penn State College of Medicine evaluated existing information on five prescription CBD and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) cannabinoid medications: antinausea medications used during cancer treatment (Marinol, Syndros, Cesamet); a medication used primarily for muscle spasms in multiple sclerosis (Sativex, which is not currently available in the US, but available in other countries); and an antiseizure medication (Epidiolex). Overall, the researchers identified 139 medications that may be affected by cannabinoids. This list was further narrowed to 57 medications, for which altered concentration can be dangerous. The list contains a variety of drugs from heart medications to antibiotics, although not all the drugs on the list may be affected by CBD-only products (some are only affected by THC). Potentially serious drug interactions with CBD included

  • a common blood thinner, warfarin
  • a heart rhythm medication, amiodarone
  • a thyroid medication, levothyroxine
  • several medications for seizure, including clobazam, lamotrigine, and valproate.

The researchers further warned that while the list may be used as a starting point to identify potential drug interactions with marijuana or CBD oil, plant-derived cannabinoid products may deliver highly variable cannabinoid concentrations (unlike the FDA-regulated prescription cannabinoid medications previously mentioned), and may contain many other compounds that can increase the risk of unintended drug interactions.

Does the form of CBD matter?

Absolutely. Inhaled CBD gets into the blood the fastest, reaching high concentration within 30 minutes and increasing the risk of acute side effects. Edibles require longer time to absorb and are less likely to produce a high concentration peak, although they may eventually reach high enough levels to cause an issue or interact with other medications. Topical formulations, such as creams and lotions, may not absorb and get into the blood in sufficient amount to interact with other medications, although there is very little information on how much of CBD gets into the blood eventually. All of this is further complicated by the fact that none of these products are regulated or checked for purity, concentration, or safety.

The bottom line: Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if using or considering CBD

CBD has the potential to interact with many other products, including over-the-counter medications, herbal products, and prescription medications. Some medications should never be taken with CBD; the use of other medications may need to be modified or reduced to prevent serious issues. The consequences of drug interactions also depend on many other factors, including the dose of CBD, the dose of another medication, and a person’s underlying health condition. Older adults are more susceptible to drug interactions because they often take multiple medications, and because of age-related physiological changes that affect how our bodies process medications.

People considering or taking CBD products should always mention their use to their doctor, particularly if they are taking other medications or have underlying medical conditions, such as liver disease, kidney disease, epilepsy, heart issues, a weakened immune system, or are on medications that can weaken the immune system (such as cancer medications). A pharmacist is a great resource to help you learn about a potential interaction with a supplement, an herbal product (many of which have their own drug interactions), or an over-the-counter or prescription medication. Don’t assume that just because something is natural, it is safe and trying it won’t hurt. It very well might.

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